Moto Life

Girls On Motorcycles – Aurorah Yarberry –

posted by Nicoletta Rolla July 5, 2017 0 comments
rara1
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Name:
Aurorah Yarberry
Location: currently Atlanta, Ga USA
Job:
Multimedia Artist ( Creative Direction, Animation, Illustration, Graphic Design, Film Editing), and aspiring Travel Writer
Motorcycle:
Currently Riverside 250D & 1970 Honda CL 350 ( though the Honda is for $ale)
@raraaaaaaaaaaaaa (13 a’s) & @wnder_full
www.wnderfull.net
www.aurorah.net

 

 

First approach with Motorcycles and first Ride experience; memories, feelings.

I’ve always loved motorcycles.

I’m pretty sure I knew I wanted to be a tattooed motorcycling artist even as a small child.

I fell in love with old Steve McQueen movies, and started saving up money for my first bike- but then I got accepted to art school in England and used my bike money to move and pay for school.

I had to wait a few more years to get my first bike, unfortunately. 

Eventually, I met someone willing to teach me to ride. So they taught me to ride dirt bikes on a gravel road next to a cliff in the rain. I had a hard time understanding how a clutch worked and fell over a lot because the Yamaha YZ 250 I was learning on was on the tall side for me. Even though the experience was less than ideal I came back for more punishment, and more and more.

Then a funny thing happened. I got better. I got better and better, and eventually, I was even teaching other people how to ride. I did take the Motorcycle Saftey Foundation course later on though to round out my riding education. One day I’d like to take some more advanced classes, it never hurts to brush up on your skills- they could save your life. 

 

AC3V8411

Photo cred @glamourconscious

 

 

What are the emotions that you experience on your motorcycle?

Adrenaline, anxiety ( at times), confidence, being “on”, peace, even aggressive at times.

Last year was kind of tough as a rider- I had my confidence shaken pretty badly for various reasons so I decided to take a break from riding a little. My anxiety was getting the best of me, and it wasn’t fun anymore.

I’m happy to say though that I think I’m over the worst of it and the last few times I’ve been out I’ve had a blast. 

 

 

 

Pickle is practicing her slow ride technique in style #mopedlife #sweaterweather #bostonterriersofinstagram #red

Un post condiviso da Aurorah Kate (@raraaaaaaaaaaaaa) in data:

More details about your Bike.
My little Riverside moped is the only bike of its kind I’ve ever seen in person.

I’ve seen one other one on the internet, so I think it might be kind of rare. I like to think of it as a little old lady who still likes to get out and shake a leg once in a while. It’s been my most reliable bike surprisingly, even though it’s coming up on 60 years old. It goes dangerously slow and at 25 mph down hill- I can ride a bicycle faster than that bike can go flat out, but there is something charming about the ease of a small displacement engine.

Age and lack of speed doesn’t stop me from taking her out- I’ll just be the last rider to arrive on a group ride. I’m ok with that. I tend to have my own adventures in that time. Sometimes it’s nice to just putter along taking in the sights more slowly. I live in town, so it’s a perfect little bike to go get coffee on.
My Honda CL 350 on the other hand, can get up to a healthy 80 mph on the right day- and I’ve had people struggle to keep up at times. It’s currently for sale though to make room for new projects.

I’ve had a bunch of different bikes over the years, from vintage Vespas, Vintage enduro dirt bikes( Suzuki TL 250)  to more modern custom GS 500. I’m having another moped ( Honda MB5) built right now that I’m really looking forward to getting to riding in the near future.

As a rider, I tend to lean towards vintage street bikes, but I wouldn’t turn my nose up at a modern dirt bike either. Those push button starts are nice to have when you’re a few miles into the woods and covered in mud and just want to get back to camp to have a cold beer after a long day of riding.

I’ve been lucky enough to help other people design their custom bikes as well ( one even won an award and made it into Iron and Air once)- it’s always a privilege to be asked to be a part of something bigger than yourself.

 

 

rara1

Photo cred @glamourconscious

 

 

A place or a road you love to enjoy Two Wheels.
I love dirt biking in the woods, but I haven’t had the opportunity to do that recently, unfortunately.

Earlier this year I was visiting friends in Nicaragua  and did get to ride down there a tiny bit. It was super different to anywhere else I’d ridden before just because of a number of animals roaming around randomly. It was pretty fun though.

But honestly, I’d love a chance to get back out into the woods and go sideways in the mud again soon.

 

 

 

A Moto trip, alone or with others or both?

With others, I’m very much a more the merrier person. But you have to pick the right people.

I’d love to have a solo adventure on two wheels one day, but I think I’ll need to invest in a more modern bike first, haha.

I once had a dream of riding my Honda from Atlanta to Alaska and back and documenting the trip.

Reality is a bitch though, and my mechanical skills simply aren’t up to riding a vintage bike that far- yet. Maybe one day if I decide to get a newer bike then that trip will be on the table again. 

 

 

The Lady Fingers Moto, a female meetup, a group of friends; what about your experience with the babes?
Lady Fingers has been a great experience- I have fond memories of riding with a rag tag group of women who all have different riding experiences and different styles of bike in the early days.

People come in and hang out for a little while and then they go off on their own adventures. It’s a cool way to get to know new friends who are also interested in riding.

Some people come into your life for a reason, some for a season. It’s taught me how important being accountable is as well as being there when a girl needs help. Maybe you’ll need help too, and one of the girls you’ve helped out in the past will stop and help you in the future.

What you put out there certainly comes back in spades. All in all Lady Fingers is a great group of women who are all great in their own ways. It’s our diversity that makes us interesting.

 

 

 

 

Is the Moto culture inspiring for your work?
Of course. I think without Moto, my personal philosophy and aesthetic would be very different from what it is.

Motorcycles are interesting from a design standpoint to me because they are the only machines where every part is on display- so if something is ugly it throws the entire look and feel of the bike off. If a line in the exhaust design is wonky- not only does it mean the exhaust probably won’t function as effectively as it could- detracting from the speed and the riding experience but also the essence of the bike itself.

When every aspect of a bike is working in harmony- design, riding experience, not to mention mechanically speaking it’s certainly comparable to high art, like sculpture, or a film; but I would argue that it’s better. Because that bike not only looks cool, it elevates you to a whole new plane of existence. You are integral to the bike too- because it needs you to run. Otherwise, it’s just a nice looking collection of parts on wheels.

What makes Moto unique to anything is that it forces you to be engaged with your body, mind, and even spirit on some levels; all at once.
As a creative, I try to think about a project like I do a motorcycle- where every aspect of a project is on show. You can’t hide a sloppy image somewhere and feel good about it. Just like that wonky exhaust line- it’s going to make a project run less than ideally and throw the whole vibe off. You can’t have that happen on set where you only have one chance at a shot and everyone depends on you getting it. That being said focusing on where you want to go both creatively ( and as a rider) can get you pretty far. Try not to fixate on some horrible thing that could happen, or you’re likely to crash right into it. Focus on the destination or the outcome you desire, and you’re far more likely to arrive there.

I love traveling more than anything, I’m currently working on turning my travel blog www.wnderfull.net into something bigger.

While it’s not necessarily a Moto only blog, bikes do make an appearance now and then when they happen to arise naturally throughout the course of an adventure.

My dream is to be able to make my blog a full-time thing where I can also work alongside with the right brands on creative direction for a unique and authentic voice and experience. I could easily see working with a motorcycling brand to achieve that goal.

 

#sundayfunday out two wheelin and dealin.

Un post condiviso da Aurorah Kate (@raraaaaaaaaaaaaa) in data:

 

What about your last adventure on Two Wheels and what will be the next one?

In February I was visiting friends in Nicaragua, and I got to ride a little bit down there. That was incredible. I’d love the chance to do more riding like that.

I got to ride around Manhattan and Brooklyn a couple of weeks ago – that had to be some of my favorite motorcycling I’ve gotten to do this year. Lane splitting over the Washington bridge between big trucks while the city lights glitter ahead of you is simply magical.

Last year I got to ride in the Smokey Mountains during the No Man’s Land camping trip- that was some beautiful country to ride in.

I’m heading out to LA next week, so if I’m lucky I’ll get to ride out there too. We’ll see!

Thanks @lyndsay_marbury for always making me feel like such a #babe

Un post condiviso da Aurorah Kate (@raraaaaaaaaaaaaa) in data:

A Motorcycle is…

…useless without a rider.

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